Being Popular Isn’t Good For You

Photo credit to Zeinamadwar

Photo credit to Zeinamadwar

Will Ingman, Staff Writer

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Nobody likes being a spectacle. Even people who crave attention can get sick of it. The line between being revered and being under a social microscope is thin and blurred. When your image is everything to the world, you’re nothing as soon as it’s altered.

But what do these admittedly vague, faux-philosophical statements mean? Well, they point to a pattern I’ve observed in multiple social environments, where someone seen as “popular” (a concept incredibly difficult to find an origin for) can only exemplify the traits that got them there.

The biggest example of this in recent memory is that of Tyler “Ninja” Blevins, and his borderline crucifixion by online media for a totally explainable decision. Ninja is a person who needs no introduction, especially to the average high school student. However, most people don’t know that he’s married to a fellow streamer named Jessica “JGhosty” Blevins (neé Goch). Recently, Ninja gave a reason for a pattern some viewers had noticed. His wife was the only female streamer featured on his channel. Immediately, the news cried “sexist!”, and forced an announcement out of the internet personality.

Tyler claims he doesn’t stream with female content creators to avoid internet drama and avoid a drama storm that could potentially compromise his marriage. Now, this is actually a smart idea, if the internet’s tendency to pair male and female personalities together ad nauseum is anything to go off. But most sources reporting Blevins’ decision refuse to admit this, if only just to vilify Twitch’s most popular streamer.

But what does this example have to do with microscoping and the negative side of popularity? Well, it seems to perfectly highlight how dramatically out of proportion your actions become when you’re successful or well-liked. Everything is a major event, nothing can be a simple drop-in-the-bucket or personal crisis. Toxic viewpoints like this can easily lead to stress or anxiety, and even complicate the situation (as I mentioned with Ninja’s marriage) to a breaking point.

So the next time you’d care to idolize someone, make sure to remember that they’re human too. Let people simply be people, and don’t turn their every waking moment into a drama spectacle. For their sake.

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